Mary Margaret Oliver – HB for Gun Confiscation/assault weapons ban in Georgia


Gun confiscation bill introduced in Georgia
Gun confiscation bill introduced in Georgia
Parsons Patrick November 29, 2016
https://www.georgiagunowners.org/2016/11/29/gun-confiscation-bill-introduced-in-georgia/

Anti-gun witch Mary Margaret Oliver knew you wouldn’t be paying attention during the Thanksgiving holiday.

That’s why she pre-filed her so-called “Assault Weapons Ban” bill (H.B. 10) the day before Thanksgiving!

Hoping she could do so without a ruckus, she forgot that Georgia Gun Owners publicly exposed her and her anti-gun cronies at the Capitol within minutes of the bill’s introduction this past January.

That’s why I’m at the Capitol — right now — to let you know what’s happening with H.B. 10, that would ban dozens of firearms in Georgia, as well as .50 caliber ammunition.

Please click here to join me for a LIVE broadcast on our Facebook page (you have to be signed into Facebook; scroll to the LIVE video when you get on our page) from just outside Oliver’s meeting of anti-gunners today at the Capitol.

ggopress

For freedom,

Patrick Parsons
Executive Director
Georgia Gun Owners

Posted in 2nd Amendment in the News, Latest News
Tagged “assault weapons” ban, Constitutional Carry, Gun control, H.B. 10, Mary Margaret Oliver, Oliver Gun Ban, shared-news

Check out this witch of a gun confiscation/gun control freak:
http://marymargaretoliver.org/


That is just the tip of the iceberg for this woman.

Many people don’t know about the tragedies within the Probate Courts of this country, and guardianships. Mary Margaret Oliver is one of the DeKalb County, Georgia Probate Court appointed guardians for children and elderly. These “guardians” rob the elderly. I don’t know if she has been involved with robbing from children’s accounts, but I do know she has been appointed by Probate Court numerous times, and have talked with the people who have had to try to stop this woman (if you will) from stealing all of the accounts blind, and that was when she was appointed by the court as an administrator over a Will that named an executor of the estate. Since there was money within the estate, the Probate court decided that the county needed to appoint the administrator.

People yall be careful out there, and keep your families away from Probate Courts if you can. Also keep guardianships away from your elderly beloved family members. Our aunt was taken from all family, hidden from family and died a horrible death while being brainwashed to think family had not looked for her. The guardian of property took our names off of our accounts, delinked all of our Wachovia brokerage/savings/checking accounts, and began spending our money. In the end, there was nothing left out of the $600,000 taken from us.
Since the DeKalb County Georgia Probate Judge (Debra Rosh, clerk at the time) was involved, as was a DeKalb County Superior Court Judge (Hunter) and Wachovia of course, no one would sue them, not one single attorney would go up against these crooks.
That was when we were forced to learn about pro se litigation. Another long story.

That’s right, Mary Margaret Oliver.
Her HB is here: http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/en-US/MemberLegislation.aspx?Member=181&Session=23

They take the name “assault weapon” to a whole new level…

Home Loans for Poor Leave Some Feeling Misled By Michael Kanell The Atlanta Journal-Constitution


Home Loans for Poor Leave Some Feeling Misled
By Michael Kanell
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
August 2, 2016

Al Butts and his wife thought they were becoming homeowners when, in 2011, they moved into their Decatur, Ga., residence.

“It sounded too good to be true, because it was such an achievement for me,” Butts said. “They said, ‘This is your house.’ ”

The too-good-to-be-true part could be right.

The Butts didn’t have a mortgage loan on the home but rather something called a “land contract,” a little-known form of lending marketed to people who can’t get regular financing.

People with a land contract put money down, make regular payments plus interest, and pay taxes and insurance. If they make payments all the way to the end of the contract, they will own the home. If they don’t they can be evicted and lose everything they put into it.

That’s what could happen to Butts and his wife, who this summer got an eviction threat after some late payments.

“It’s a 30-year contract. You could make payments every month and lose it in year 29,” said Kristin Tullos of Decatur Legal Aid, which is representing the couple as they try to stay in the home.

Georgia, like most states, does not regulate land contracts, which are also known as “contract for deed.” Critics generally do not argue that they are illegal. But they say companies offering them target credit-starved, minority neighborhoods and deceive consumers. The deals typically carry interest rates well above those for mortgages.

Fueled by housing crisis

The practice was fueled by the housing crisis, which put millions of homes on the market at huge discounts while also savaging consumers’ credit ratings.

No one has recent numbers, but 3.5 million people bought a home through a land contract in 2009, according to the U.S. Census. “Evidence suggests that land contracts are making a resurgence in the wake of the foreclosure crisis,” a recent report from the National Consumer Law Center said.

Equity firms and real estate companies bought thousands of depressed properties as investments, renting them until the market made a resale lucrative.

A small group of companies have added “contract for deed” deals as a profitable variation aimed at minorities, according to the group’s report.

Dallas-based Harbour Portfolio Advisors — the name on the Butts’ deed — is one of the largest with an estimated 6,700 properties in five states.

Calls from the AJC to Harbour over the past several weeks were not returned, but earlier this year, a lawyer for Harbour told the New York Times that the company’s business model is “to purchase unproductive residential properties and sell them to other people who will make them productive again.”

Local attorneys say there’s no indication Harbour set out to exploit minorities. But in choosing low-income, foreclosure-afflicted areas and appealing to people who cannot get traditional mortgages, Harbour ends up with a clientele that is largely black.

In metro Atlanta, Harbour had 94 properties, in Fulton, DeKalb, Cobb, Gwinnett, Clayton and Rockdale counties, the report said. “The common theme is that land contracts were being sold predominantly to borrowers of color.”

Shut out of mortgages

From the 1930s to 1950s, when blacks were shut out of many mortgage programs, land contracts were often the most common form of home-buying. But the contracts did not fulfill their promise then — and still don’t, the Law Center report concluded.

“Then, as now, homeownership through these deals was often a mirage, and buyers lost their homes, their down payments, their sweat equity, and the money they paid for repairs, maintenance, insurance, and interest,” the report said.

For depressed areas, the impact is not all bad — it puts people into houses that might otherwise be vacant, said Deirdre Oakley, sociology professor and housing expert at Georgia State University.

But for people who aspire to own a home, it isn’t a good deal due to the risk and interest charged, she said.

A big motive for buying a home is to build equity — to gain wealth as the property value rises. With a contract for deed, the consumer only gains if he or she completes the full payment schedule and becomes the owner.

“They are basically like renters but also paying interest and insurance and taxes and paying for repairs,” Oakley said. “You are giving them a chance to own a home, but you are not giving them much of a chance.”

For the deal to be at all fair, customers need to know exactly what they are getting into, said Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Zillow, a national real estate research firm.

“They target people who are less informed. They are often taken advantage of,” she said.

Al Butts doesn’t claim to be blameless, but he feels misled.

‘Flim-flam from the git-go’

“I told them right up front I was on a fixed income, and I have made up every payment I’ve been late on,” he said. “The way I think of it, it was a flim-flam from the git-go. It was like we were their cash-cow.”

Irene Cole and her husband thought they were buying an East Point home from Harbour in 2013 for $49,000. They put $1,500 down, agreed to a 9.9 interest rate on the rest and started paying $605.92 a month.

“We were told that the house was ours,” Cole said.

Their land contract was sold, however, and they dealt with a series of other companies. They had a disagreement with one about which bank account the company was taking money from — when it came from the wrong account, there wasn’t enough money.

Later, they missed some payments but say they weren’t sure who to send a check to.

Now, they’ve received notice that their house is scheduled for a foreclosure hearing. They are working with attorneys at Legal Aid to fight the foreclosure.

They first sought to refinance through Home Safe Georgia, a state program aimed at helping people avoid foreclosure.

“But when we went to Home Safe Georgia,” Cole said, “they said we can’t help you because you don’t own the property.”
© 2016 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency

DeKalb County Georgia Judge Cynthia J. Becker, May Get Her Just Due!

New Trials for DeKalb Corruption Convicts Were Wrong, Judges Say

Kathleen Baydala Joyner, Daily Report

http://www.dailyreportonline.com/id=1202720970954?keywords=Pat+Reid+Tony+Pope&publication=Daily+Report&slreturn=20150223141513

March 18, 2015

The Georgia Court of Appeals has agreed with prosecutors that DeKalb County Superior Court Judge Cynthia Becker was wrong to reverse the felony corruption convictions of a former county school district administrator and her ex-husband.

The decision by the three-judge appeals panel on Wednesday extends a roller-coaster ride for the defendants, who were released from prison after Becker’s surprise order last fall. The appeals court vacated Becker’s order granting a new trial to former schools chief operating officer Pat Reid.

Judge William Ray II wrote for the panel that even though Becker didn’t believe the testimony of Reid’s co-defendant and former boss, Crawford Lewis, Becker did not fully weigh Lewis’ testimony against the remaining evidence before granting a new trial to Reid. The court remanded Reid’s case to the trial court for further consideration of Reid’s motion for new trial.

The panel also reversed Becker’s order granting a new trial to Reid’s ex-husband, architect Tony Pope, stating she lacked authority over that matter.

A county grand jury indicted Reid, Pope and Lewis, the former schools superintendent, for conspiracy and theft in July 2013. The charges stemmed from allegations they manipulated school construction contracts for personal gain.

In October 2013, Lewis pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor obstruction charge in exchange for his testimony at trial against Reid and Pope. A trial jury convicted Reid and Pope in November 2013 of racketeering. Reid also was convicted of theft.

Reid received a 15-year prison sentence, and Pope received an eight-year prison sentence.

Lewis’ plea agreement with the DeKalb district attorney’s office called for a sentence of 12 months of probation. But Becker rejected that part of the deal and instead sentenced Lewis to a year in prison.

“Without challenging the truthfulness of Lewis’ testimony, the trial judge—admittedly incensed by what she considered to be the ‘abhorrent’ criminal conduct of all involved—emphasized that Lewis was ‘a public official, this was on his watch, he stood by. And then he hindered and interfered with and tried to stop the completion of a rightful, lawful investigation,'” Ray wrote in the opinion, quoting Becker’s words at Lewis’ sentencing.

Lewis then filed a motion for reconsideration, which Becker denied. The appeals court found Becker “changed her rationale for refusing to consummate the previously agreed upon plea deal, and stated for the first time that her rejection of Lewis’ plea and the resultant sentence were based upon ‘the credibility, the believability, the probability or the improbability of (Lewis’) testimony.'”

Lewis appealed, and the DA’s office—concerned about its credibility in making plea deals—took Lewis’ side. The Court of Appeals last October remanded Lewis’ case to Becker so she could identify specific testimony by Lewis that she considered to be questionable. In a footnote of that opinion, the court implied that if the credibility of Lewis’ testimony was in question, then the validity of Reid’s and Pope’s convictions should also be questioned.

Becker responded before the appeals court could send its remittitur, pointing out pieces of Lewis’ testimony she found untruthful and ordering new trials for Reid and Pope.

The Court of Appeals responded, halting her orders and the release of Reid and Pope from prison.

Reid and Pope had indeed filed motions for new trials, but Pope’s attorney withdrew his motion just before Becker entered her order and filed a notice of appeal. The DA’s office has alleged that this action was the result of ex parte communications between Becker and Pope’s lawyer.

Because Pope no longer had a pending motion for new trial, the Court of Appeals on Wednesday found that Becker’s order related to Pope was improper as a matter of law.

Becker later acknowledged that she was the subject of an investigation by the Judicial Qualifications Commission but said she would step down March 1 to get married. Gov. Nathan Deal received a short list of candidates from his Judicial Nominating Commission nearly two months ago but has not yet made an appointment.

DeKalb Superior Court Judge Gregory Adams granted Reid and Pope bond in December.

A spokesman for DeKalb District Attorney Robert James had no comment.

Reid’s attorney, Tony Axam, said his client will remain free on bond while the trial court considers her motion for new trial. Axam also said he is confident that Lewis’ testimony was crucial for prosecutors and so the remaining evidence would not be enough to convict his client.

However, Axam seemed perplexed that another judge, one who did not witness Lewis’ testimony first hand, will be the one to decide whether Reid should get a new trial.

“I contend only Judge Becker can talk about whether Crawford Lewis passed the smell test,” he said.

Axam said he may consider subpoenaing Becker as a witness.

Pope’s attorney, John Petrey, could not be reached for comment

JQC Files Complaint Against Ex-DeKalb Judge

Kathleen Baydala Joyner, Daily Report

http://www.dailyreportonline.com/id=1202721365396/JQC-Files-Complaint-Against-ExDeKalb-Judge?et=editorial&bu=Daily%20Report&cn=20150323&src=EMC-Email&pt=Breaking%20News&slreturn=20150223141240

March 23, 2015    | 0 Comments

(Image of Cynthia Becker Courtesy of KENT D. JOHNSON/AJC)

Former DeKalb County Superior Court Judge Cynthia Becker is the subject of an official ethics complaint filed Monday with the Supreme Court of Georgia.

The state Judicial Qualifications Commission, the agency tasked with investigating and prosecuting wayward judges, has charged Becker with six counts of violating the Code of Judicial Conduct, mostly related to her handling of a 2013 DeKalb County schools corruption case.

That case resulted in the convictions of former school system COO Pat Reid and her ex-husband, architect Tony Pope. The jury found that Reid and Pope conspired to fix school construction contracts for personal gain. Former schools superintendent Crawford Lewis was to be a co-defendant in the case but took a pretrial deal in which he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor obstruction charge in exchange for his testimony against Reid and Pope. All three were eventually sentenced to prison time.

Lewis successfully appealed his sentence to the state Court of Appeals, with the judges holding that Becker should have honored the district attorney’s deal allowing Lewis to be free on probation. Becker had said she didn’t believe Lewis’ testimony.

The state Court of Appeals last week overturned Becker’s order granting new trials for Reid and Pope.

In its filing with the high court, the JQC charged Becker with failing to honor the plea agreement between Lewis and the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office; making false or misleading statements to the commission about whether she knew if Lewis or his attorneys had sought bond; engaging in improper ex parte communications with attorneys for Reid and Pope; and making public comments in a political forum about the Lewis case.

Two other charges stemmed from her actions while serving as the court’s November/December grand jury term judge. The JQC has charged Becker with refusing to perform her duty to charge the jurors and accept the return of new indictments in open court.

Although Becker stepped down from the bench on March 1, as she promised to do last fall, the JQC claims she is still subject to the judicial code because a complaint was filed within a year of her time as a judge.

Becker said Monday that she had not seen the JQC’s filing and had no comment on its contents.

The Daily Report will have more details later Monday and in Tuesday’s print edition.

ALL IN THE FAMILY! The husband of former DeKalb County Commissioner Elaine Boyer has pleaded guilty to illegally obtaining county funds to help fund his and his wife’s personal lives

Husband of Former DeKalb Commissioner Pleads Guilty Theft of Funds

The husband and wife concocted a scheme to use county funds to pay for personal expenses.
By Justin Ove (Patch Staff)
February 26, 2015 at 11:47am

Husband of Former DeKalb Commissioner Pleads Guilty Theft of Funds
The husband of former DeKalb County Commissioner Elaine Boyer has pleaded guilty to illegally obtaining county funds to help fund his and his wife’s personal lives, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced this week.

John Boyer brewed up a kickback scheme which saw Boyer hire a family friend as an advisor, who then submitted invoices to the county to the tune of $80,000, prosecutors said. As it turns out, the advisor did nothing to benefit DeKalb County, and $60,000 of the invoice money was funneled into the Boyers’ bank account to alleviate their personal financial problems.

Elaine Boyer resigned from the DeKalb County Board of Commissioners on Aug. 25, 2014 and subsequently pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiring to commit mail fraud and wire fraud. Her sentencing hearing will be held on March 20.

John Boyer pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit mail fraud, and will be sentenced on March 6.

AJC: Police ID man shot by officer at DeKalb apartment complex 6:11 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014

Mike Morris
Police ID man shot by officer at DeKalb apartment complex
6:11 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014 | Filed in: Local News


http://www.ajc.com/news/news/police-armed-man-shot-by-officer-at-dekalb-apartme/njcn9/

The shooting happened at the Marquis Forest apartments on Pine Tree Circle.
Justin Crate/ WSB-TV

The shooting happened at the Marquis Forest apartments on Pine Tree Circle.
An armed man was shot by a DeKalb County officer who went to an apartment complex off Covington Highway on Monday night to investigate a stabbing, police said.

The incident happened around 8:50 p.m. at the Marquis Forest Apartments on Pine Tree Circle after someone called 911 to report the stabbing. The responding officer heard loud arguing as he approached the apartment, and it continued even after he knocked on the apartment door, which went unanswered. As the officer opened the door, he was charged by a large dog, which he was forced to fatally shoot, DeKalb police spokesman Capt. Stephen Fore said.

The dog’s owner then came to the door holding a gun. The officer ordered the man to drop the weapon several times, but he refused, police said. That led the officer to shoot the man, identified as 44-year-old Kevin Davis.

DeKalb officer shoots suspect after responding to stabbing call
Davis was struck in the abdomen, and he was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital in critical condition. He faces a charge of aggravated assault on a police officer, Fore said.

Inside the apartment, authorities found a 37-year-old woman suffering from a non-life-threatening stab wound. She also was taken to Grady.

The suspect in the woman’s stabbing, who was not named by police Tuesday evening, returned to the apartment and was taken into police custody.

Davis is not a suspect in the stabbing, Fore said.

No officers were hurt during the incident, which remains under investigation.

RELATED

Corrupt Judge In DeKalb County Georgia Superior Court, Judge Cynthia J Becker In the Spotlight!

Of all the times I have bitched about DeKalb County and Georgia Courts being corrupt as hell, I ain’t the only one saying it!  I knew that GA Power bought and paid for Judge Becker in DeKalb County Superior Court.  It was a cut and dry case, we won.  GA Power claimed to have an easement over our property.  They had a document that had the wrong Land Lot and wrong District, the street was spelled wrong.  She would not rule on the document, and GA Power claimed that we wanted a ruling on the ultimate issue.  There was only one issue, whether or not they had a legal easement.  The didn’t.

In the end, Becker gave GA Power easement over our whole property, when we had been dismissed with prejudice two years before she ruled.  She only dismissed with prejudice because she would not grant recusal, and she ended up being named a defendant in our Federal Court case.  She can’t rule over our property, when there is no longer a Plaintiff, and the case was not an in rem case. I am curious how much she was paid to do all that she did to us.

Now… check this out:

From:  http://www.ajc.com/news/news/breaking-news/judge-in-dekalb-schools-corruption-case-responds-t/nh4f4/

Judge in DeKalb schools corruption case responds to criticism

Free access to myAJC for AJC subscribers.

EXPLORE

DeKalb County Superior Court Judge Cynthia Becker on Monday acknowledged that she was the subject of a state judicial investigation but she also disputed allegations that she had met improperly with attorneys for a former school construction official and her ex-husband who were convicted of racketeering.

Becker has been at the center of a back-and-forth of rulings, orders and motions concerning her decisions in the misdemeanor case against former DeKalb School Superintendent Crawford Lewis and the felony cases against Pat Reid and architect Tony Pope, who prosecutors said manipulated school construction projects to enrich themselves. The State Court of Appeals has weighed in several times in response to orders Becker has issued and motions filed by District Attorney Robert James, who accused the judge of 14 years of improprieties.

It began when Becker refused to support a plea deal of 12 months probation in exchange for Lewis’ truthful testimony against Reid and Pope; Lewis struck the deal to avoid a possible felony racketeering case and decades in prison. Becker sentenced Lewis to jail, instead of probation, because she said she did not believe him, setting of the flurry of legal filings over the past year.

 

Last Friday, James wrote a filing with the Georgia Court of Appeals that Becker was biased and had tipped off defense lawyers before throwing out Reid’s and Pope’s convictions and ordering the two released from prison immediately. That would give Pope’s lawyers a chance to recall their notice of appeal and replace it with a motion for a new trial, which would keep the case under Becker’s control.

On Monday, in a statement emailed to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Becker responded to some of those criticisms.

Becker said there was nothing improper about contacting Reid’s and Pope’s attorneys because she was only asking for information about where they were serving their prison sentences so she would know where to send the order that they be released pending a new trial.

Becker overturned their convictions because she said they were based on testimony she thought was untruthful, but the state Court of Appeals followed up by saying her order should not be enforced until a hearing.

In her statement, Becker ticked off the allegations raised in the DA’s filing but she also acknowledged that the Judicial Qualifications Commission was investigating “the procedural actions in case.” But she learned of the JQC review weeks before the back-and-forth that started with the court of appeals last month. She did not elaborate on what issue was before the JQC and she declined to comment beyond what she had written.

“To my knowledge, prior to last week, no allegations of misconduct had been filed by anyone,” Becker said.

Becker wrote that the district attorney had filed a “written, supposedly confidential, complaint with the JQC” that the media reported. “The confidentiality of that process has been breached by others. I stand by my decisions and I will accept any lawful correction of any purported errors,” Becker wrote.

The Court of Appeals said Becker had to list the reasons she believed Lewis lied during his testimony, which she did in a subsequent order. The DA countered in another brief, saying she did not give specifics.

“I have, in each and every case before me, made findings of fact based on the evidence as I heard it,” Becker said. “I have then applied the law to those facts in making my decisions. I have never considered the position any individual held, who the lawyers were, the socio-economic status, political agendas or any inappropriate matter. I have made decisions based on the law, period.”

Becker then writes about conversations she had with Reid’s and Pope’s lawyers before she issued an order overturning their convictions and setting a new trial. Becker ruled that the two should be released from prison in the meanwhile. Reid was sentenced to 15 years and Pope was serving eight years. They were convicted of manipulating school contracts to benefit Pope and his firm.

“I called their attorneys to verify the exact locations of each defendant,” Becker wrote. “It was important that the orders (for their release) go directly to those prisons…. There was no need to involve the DA’s office in that procedural communications, just as there had been no need to involve the attorneys for Pope and Reid months earlier when the district attorneys and defendant Lewis’ attorneys met with me in my office with the proposed plea deal.

She wrote that while some had said this issue could end her judicial career, it has long been her plan to resign from the seat she has held 14 years because she is getting married next spring.

“I am happily exchanging the very public life of a judge for a very private life with my husband,” Becker wrote.

The judge said she will give the governor “my letter of resignation after closing out professional obligations later this year as planned.”

The Cops Are Murdering People and the Attorneys Are Stealing From Them, And the Judges Ignore Both!

Posted: 5:04 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014

Partner in firm accused of stealing $30 million

By Mike Petchenik

http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/former-employee-allegedly-stole-millions-real-esta/ng9yk/

NORTH FULTON COUNTY, Ga —

Nat Hardwick photo
Former real estate employee, Nat Hardwick, allegedly stole millions from firm

The former managing partner of a large Atlanta real estate firm faces a lawsuit that claims he stole millions of dollars from the firm.

The lawsuit, obtained from a source by Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik, was filed Monday at Fulton County Superior court, and alleges that Nat Hardwick, a partner in Morris, Hardwick and Schneider, had taken at least $30 million from firm accounts and from escrow accounts belonging to Landcastle Title.

The lawsuit alleged that Hardwick took “approximately a $1,000,000 to pay providers of private jet services,” and made “$4,000,000 in wire transfers to casinos.”

The lawsuit also alleges that Hardwick covered up his actions until they were discovered by auditors.

In a memo sent to customers Monday, also obtained by Petchenik through a source, firm officials confirmed that Hardwick had resigned his position.

“These activities have negatively affected the future of our company and our customers,” the memo said. “However, Fidelity National Title Group, one of our long-standing and trusted partners, has agreed to step in as 70 percent owner of Landcastle Title.”

The memo said FNTG was funding any shortages to accounts and that they were moving forward with “business as usual.”

An attorney representing Morris, Hardwick and Schneider in the lawsuit told Petchenik they could not comment because it was pending litigation.

Hardwick’s attorney, Ed Garland, sent Petchenik a statement about the allegations:

“A civil lawsuit has been filed against Nat Harwick. Nat is not guilty of any improper, illegal or unethical conduct. Nat became aware of a problem with the accounting earlier this summer and immediately alerted his partners and initiated a review by outside auditors.

“Nat is a founder of the firm Morris Hardwick Schneider and has nurtured its growth for over 23 years.  Under Nat’s leadership, the firm grew to 52 offices in thirteen states with eight hundred employees conducting thirty-six thousand yearly transactions involving billions of dollars.

“Anybody who knows Nat knows that he loves the law firm, its employees, the attorneys and the firm’s many loyal clients. He would never knowingly or intentionally take money he was not entitled to or harm the firm or its clients in any way. The firm was profitable, and Nat believed that all of the money he received was properly distributed to him as his share of the profits of the firm.

“The claims made against Nat in this suit are false, and Nat looks forward to clearing his name.”

Garland told Petchenik he was not aware of any law enforcement involvement in investigating the allegations.

Roswell realtor Creed Crutchfield, who has dealt with the firm, told Petchenik allegations such as this makes consumers nervous.

“It just affects everybody in the industry and it makes my job just that much harder,” he said.

Crutchfield said that realty firms are being warned to double-check any closings they had with the firm to ensure everything was handled properly.

“Those real estate agents might want to make sure they check with the companies they closed with to make sure everything is fine for their clients,” he said.

ANYBODY CAN FORECLOSE ON YOU IN GEORGIA!

WTF?

The Georgia Supreme Court determined back when they made the ruling on the You case, that the foreclosing entity does not have to hold the Note, does not have to hold the security deed, and does not have to have an interest in the loan.’

It should not surprise anyone, they had been allowing it to go on for a long time.  Now, I am seeing the people who were foreclosed upon between 4 and 6 years ago, are being foreclosed upon again, but this time, by someone new, a different Lender, that never existed.  One day the real Lender will come, and they too will foreclose on the borrower.

Has everything gotten so bad, that the courts just don’t care?  What ever happened to contract law?  Are they going to allow all contracts to be violated by lenders, or just when it comes to real property?

I saw someone the other day, Bank of America had allegedly foreclosed upon the man.  Bank of America not only foreclosed, but evicted  the man as well.  Bank of Americas name is on the  Deed Under Power.  Bank of America swore under Oath that they were the current party with right to foreclose.  A month and a half later, US Bank sold the property to a third party, because they claim that they were the party with rights to the property.

So lets’s get this straight, when did Bank of America turn into US Bank?  There was nothing in the record showing Bank of America had any claim to the Note or Deed, nothing showing that Bank of America is anything to the loan.  The Deed Under Power of Sale, has Bank of America’s name on  it, with some of those squiggly marks that the foreclosing attorneys have been signing for years, to create a fictional assignment.  But… US Bank be damned, they were going to get some of that action.  So without any documentation recorded anywhere, of any kind, US Bank sold the property to a third party.

Good Ole DeKalb County!

 

http://biscuette.com/2012/07/16/fake-gregory-adams-debra-deberry-fun-new-characters-in-the-tragi-comedy-of-dekalb-county-government/#comment-2552

le biscuette Has It Right, Thank You For Your Truthful Rendition of DeKalb County, Georgia!!!

Fake Gregory Adams, Debra DeBerry Fun New Characters in the Tragi-comedy of Dekalb County Government

July 16, 2012

By 

Ah, Dekalb County, what a thriving bastion of the American spirit. We’ve been blessed with such American heroes as Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney, who proudly took to Libyan state television to decry US involvement in the movement against brutal dictator Moammar Gaddafi; there’s former Dekalb CEO Vernon Jones, for whom Dekalb taxpayers are on the hook for upwards of five million dollars in legal fees for a reverse discrimination lawsuit; we’ve got Dekalb school superintendent Crawford Lewis, indicted for operating a “crime ring” from his post. And these are just the most visible of our trusted public servants. Beneath the crusty surface of Dekalb County’s political life–embodied by McKinney, Jones, Lewis, and the like–is a colorful cast of crooks and con artists whose power to defraud derives from their elected or appointed post.

The July 31, 2012 political primary election has brought forth at least two fun new characters. And that’s sort of exciting, isn’t it? It’s like getting a new Angry Bird, or a zany addition to the cast of the Simpsons. It’s a fun addition to what is already a colorful and hilarious mix of deviants, a new car full of clowns to delight and entertain us as they bilk our precious tax dollars, and wreck our sacred institutions, for their own corrupt ends.

Let’s turn first to Debra DeBerry, who currently sits as the Clerk of Superior Court of Dekalb County. This is basically the person in charge of administering the functions of the highest county court, where death penalties can be issued, huge civil verdicts reached, marriages dissolved–basically, all the most important and consequential events that can happen in the life of a county. How did DeBerry become the Clerk? You’d assume she was elected, right? Nope. Or appointed by the governor, something to that effect? Not exactly. Deberry became Clerk in 2011 after the long-term Clerk, Linda Carter, resigned. No big deal, right? Well…

According to lawyers representing Linda Carter, Carter didn’t write her resignation letter. It was written by–guess who?–Debra DeBerry, signed by Carter, and then delivered to the governor’s office that very day by one of DeBerry’s subordinates. At the time, Carter was suffering from an Alzheimer’s-like mental illness. The kicker: not only did the DeBerry-drafted letter announce Carter’s resignation, it also named DeBerry as Carter’s replacement. Some coverage of the scandal below:

Now, of course, DeBerry denied wrongdoing. And apparently the lawsuit was settled before trial, so we’ll never know who was “right or wrong” here. But the entire situation smells incredibly nasty, doesn’t it?